Rome can’t be seen in a day — The start of my second visit

Arrivederci. Or, “hello” in the Queen’s. Today marks my second visit to Italy’s capital and boy it didn’t disappoint. While yesterday I lacked the energy to visit after a hectic journey from Vienna, today I managed the 16,000 step — or just over 11.5km
— journey around Rome’s major sights. Sure, this crazy distance might’ve partly been due to my inability to navigate with Google maps, but it certainly allowed me to again experience the natural beauty of this historic city.

Getting around in Rome — It’s a easy peasy

Once again I fell foul of poorly planning my hotel booking. Booking.com has this way of rushing me through the process of choosing a place with its constant reminders that every hotel in the world will be booked in 5 minutes unless I book now. This resulted in me booking a hotel 20 minutes away from the Vatican, which while not disastrous meant I had a 15 minute walk to Baldo Degli Ubaldi metro stop ride and a 10 minute underground journey to get to Rome Termini (the main station in central Rome).

Rome’s underground service isn’t as organised as say Vienna’s or Berlin’s, but nothing really is in Italy. Don’t get me wrong, if you’re travelling from Rome Termini or any of the major landmark areas it’s relatively easy, but as you have to change at Termini for nearly all connections it results in a lot of human traffic. Tickets are also pretty simple to purchase and the options aren’t too confusing, with a decent one, two or three-day pass available — very handy for tourists. If you’re going to purchase a single ticket — €1.50 and usable for 100 minutes of unlimited travel across the network — then you must have spare change, as the maximum value note accepted is €5. I purchased the three-day ticket for €18, as I had no smaller notes.

Going to the Pope’s house

My day started with a metro ride from Degli Ubali to Flamino (I think). Here I jumped off and went straight for St. Peter’s Bascilla, which is the Pope’s regular digs. As if by some divine intervention the whole area became heavenly bright as soon as I arrived, allowing me to get some pretty decent photos.

Tried to get it on airbnb but the Pope doesn’t offer breakfast

Obviously stunning, it’s even more impressive during the winter months as the majority of tourists don’t think Rome is worth visiting in January. Take it from me, if you like sightseeing peacefully then you’ll love it.

Quite fancy this in my garden

There are a few things to see here including the fountains and the big pointy thing in the centre.

Big pointy thing. Could be the pope’s satellite dish.

From there I decided to find somewhere to eat, but before doing so I had to cross the bridge of doom. For those who aren’t familiar, it’s near Castel Sant’Angelo and looks like this…

Seems like an innocent bridge, right?

And while it looks seemingly innocuous now, it’s even worse in the summer. But why is it so dangerous? Well, because of these people…

Avoid these people like the plague.

These people would sell you a tour of your own bedroom if they could. They are experts in gaining your attention and earphones will not dissuade them. While they congregate around the Bascilla, it’s restricted spaces they operate best, and while you might find yourself repeating ‘no thank you, I’m not interested in a tour’ don’t give in… don’t let them wear you down.

Alright, I’m about to fall asleep so will update the rest when I get chance. For now, caio and good night.

2 Comments

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I can’t believe you didn’t entertain the Bridge People!
Could have wound them up in some way!
Hope all’s good
Mother

It’s so beautiful & I can’t believe I never visited Rome / Italy before. Yes your mum’s right you could have wound up the windups.You could have said yo
I have a fleet of transportation at my feet as I am Ammen royalty.Middle east but as you are on your own you need not wear the tea towel. LOL

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